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Stocker brookies look different than wild brookies


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#1 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:22 AM

I fished an mnr stocked pond. Brookie I caught was blue with no orange at all. I wonder why this is.
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#2 Huronfly

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:24 AM

got a pic? fish change colours somewhat to camouflage with their surroundings. Maybe was brought up in a blue tank lol.


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#3 Will

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 02:12 PM

@Adamthedrummer - not to question your judgment - but just wondering if there's splake in that pond too? Could make it a lot more steel/blue looking, while having the exact same body and tail shape, than you're typical olive/orange speck.


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#4 fishfreek

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 09:24 AM

If the fins are not clipped or damaged (usually in the tank), its hard to determine if the fish is native or stocked. This is my experience and opinion.


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#5 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 04:25 PM

I didn't inspect it too closely for fin damage. No splake in the pond. Just specs. I wonder if it's the trout pellets they feed them in the hatchery. I caught a couple stockers yesterday and a couple wild and quite a difference in colour.
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#6 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 04:28 PM

It was in a stream with stockers and wild mixed btw
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#7 fishfreek

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 04:46 PM

How do you determine a stocked from a wild (native) if you don't  mind me asking?


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#8 Huronfly

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:17 PM

A lot of times when fish are in a hatchery they are unaware what time of year it is, and therefor take up spawning colours at times of the year that are irregular and that the native fish would not show. I do some hatchery volunteering and I wouldn't believe that the pellets have anything to due with pigmentation of the skin.


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#9 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:53 PM

I find stockers have very pale meat and wild have orange.
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#10 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:06 AM

I recently found some spots that were well stocked some 10 years ago. I guess after 10 years they could be considered a wild population lol. Interesting variations in the shape of some of these trout.
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#11 DILLIGAF?!

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:27 AM

If it's a pond, will there really be a wild brookie in there? 


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#12 Symmetre

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:38 AM

If it's a pond, will there really be a wild brookie in there? 

 

Sometimes, yes. If the pond is fed by a creek that has wild trout in it, they can and often do venture into the pond. It's quite common.


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#13 FrequentFlyer

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:06 AM

How do you determine a stocked from a wild (native) if you don't mind me asking?


Stocked fish will always have their adipose fin clipped, only way to tell that they are stocked fish. Makes it a quick and easy identification for when the ministry does surveys, no adipose fin, stocked, adipose fin, wild.
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#14 Symmetre

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 09:32 AM

Stocked fish will always have their adipose fin clipped, only way to tell that they are stocked fish. Makes it a quick and easy identification for when the ministry does surveys, no adipose fin, stocked, adipose fin, wild.

 

Not true. When they're stocked as fingerlings, trout and salmon are never clipped because they're too small. With budget cuts and the cost of raising fish, probably 80% - 85% of all trout and salmon in Ontario are now stocked as fingerlings. Which means now, 80% - 85% of stocked fish have no fin clips. It's been that way for several years now.

 

FYI, salmon and rainbows haven't been clipped by Ontario since the 80s. NY still clips some smolts. We don't.


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#15 tossing iron

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:37 AM

Clipped,tagged, chipped, stamped
Like everything else now a days technology evolves so quickly.
Lots of things not true today that were true yesterday.
Most on here, myself included, know just what we've read or self experience.
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#16 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:43 PM

Caught two today in a thick cedar bush that were black. Except for the yellow spots and white band on the belly. Really neat. Only two fish in the pool so I released them. Both 10 inchers.
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#17 fishfreek

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:48 PM

Nice job , probably male and female.


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#18 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:23 PM

Yes definitely a pair. And the water was thin after the pool so I didn't want to hurt the population
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#19 Adamthedrummer

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:30 PM

Realized specs come in every shape and color. What an amazing species!! Now if only I could nab a nice Brown...
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