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Spawning For Steelhead


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#1 bigugly

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 10:27 PM

Ive done some research and have red that the fish don't start spawning till at earliest February but I hear a lot of talk of fish already dropping eggs and I caught a hen today that was real lean and looks like she was a drop back in the spring  Do they drop eggs in fall? Just curious to try and educate myself more on this amazing fish.

 


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#2 fishfight

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 12:41 AM

Many steelhead and brown trout have been spawning now to my surprise as well.
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#3 Symmetre

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 03:46 PM

Some hatchery fish (esp. US fish) are ripe in early winter. Its not natural, they've been created that way in the hatchery by breeding for early spawning fish.


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#4 Disco

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 10:15 PM

Steelhead are an amazing species. Several different strains are fall/winter spawners. Hatchery breeding may have something to do with fish that are spawning in fall/winter but it is more likely the hatchery is using a strain of steelhead that was a fall/winter spawner. Bc has several strains of fall/winter spawning fish. Steelhead have been adapting to our rivers over time and several differences exist between fish running rivers based on what they face in each individual river. A good example is the Credit having such an extreme gradient over the length of the river the fish that are natural production in the river are longer and leaner than East Ditch creeks. They were at one point all from the same strain but signifacnt advantages over time from individuals in each population have differentiated the populations in ways which suit the river they run. Not all Steelhead even return to the river they originate from. A small portion of the population of each river roam to run a different river. In this way they can spread to new rivers. Truly a diverse and amazing fish.
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#5 IR4J

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:55 AM

Steelhead are an amazing species. Several different strains are fall/winter spawners. Hatchery breeding may have something to do with fish that are spawning in fall/winter but it is more likely the hatchery is using a strain of steelhead that was a fall/winter spawner. Bc has several strains of fall/winter spawning fish. Steelhead have been adapting to our rivers over time and several differences exist between fish running rivers based on what they face in each individual river. A good example is the Credit having such an extreme gradient over the length of the river the fish that are natural production in the river are longer and leaner than East Ditch creeks. They were at one point all from the same strain but signifacnt advantages over time from individuals in each population have differentiated the populations in ways which suit the river they run. Not all Steelhead even return to the river they originate from. A small portion of the population of each river roam to run a different river. In this way they can spread to new rivers. Truly a diverse and amazing fish.

Couldnt have said it better... I will also add that the bulk of spawning activity happens with water temperature from around 40*F-58*F, and independant studies have shown the colder the water the higher chance of success. But then you look at the skamania strain of steelhead which enter creeks in the middle of summer when water temps could be over 80*... I doubt we will ever fully understand them.


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#6 fishfreek

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:25 PM

80 degrees is a bit extreme. Rivers or creeks in the middle of summer months I don’t think so. Shallow lakes and ponds possible.
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#7 DILLIGAF?!

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 02:49 PM

If you frequent East further than BMV..the strain is somehow similar (in appearance to the Credit & Bronte strain). 


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#8 Swing4Steel

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:09 PM

There are multiple strains in every river. My local has like 19 distinct strains
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#9 Huronfly

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 10:20 AM

There's a reason Skamania didn't last in Ontario... they enter rivers during the worst possible time for spawning. High temps and low flows. I believe most successful spawning also takes places through the winter.


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#10 Symmetre

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 10:50 AM

There's a reason Skamania didn't last in Ontario... they enter rivers during the worst possible time for spawning. High temps and low flows.

 

LOL ... ya, just like Atlantics.


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#11 IR4J

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 10:58 AM

80 degrees is a bit extreme. Rivers or creeks in the middle of summer months I don’t think so. Shallow lakes and ponds possible.

"could be over 80*"


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#12 Legend Boats

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 01:19 PM

Ive done some research and have red that the fish don't start spawning till at earliest February but I hear a lot of talk of fish already dropping eggs and I caught a hen today that was real lean and looks like she was a drop back in the spring  Do they drop eggs in fall? Just curious to try and educate myself more on this amazing fish.

 

Ive done some research and have red that the fish don't start spawning till at earliest February but I hear a lot of talk of fish already dropping eggs and I caught a hen today that was real lean and looks like she was a drop back in the spring  Do they drop eggs in fall? Just curious to try and educate myself more on this amazing fish.

 

Great question! Fish are an amazing creature. Steelhead even more so. While there are two ways to answer this question, I'll just leave you with a different way of looking at it; There are no rules or laws. These steelhead aren't like a human, they can't decide to the minute, hour, day or week when they'll be on their bed spawning, if there even make it there. Whatever variable you can throw into the mix, do it, there's bound to be a bunch of fish affected by it. You cannot say the steelhead will lay their eggs this month, it doesn't work like that. Instead, I suggest focusing your efforts into learning, and observing, the water temps. Steelhead thrive in water temps between 40 and 58 degrees, with the lower portion of that range slowing their metabolism, in turn, depending on the waterbody, forcing you to change up presentations. Steelhead absolutely spawn in the fall, the spring run is just much better as we're getting spring runoff from all the melting snow which allows for easier runs to their respective spawning grounds.

 

Please consider catch and release fishing whenever possible to help sustain our amazing fisheries.

 

Kyle Legend Boats

Great question! Fish are an amazing creature. Steelhead even more so. While there are two ways to answer this question, I'll just leave you with a different way of looking at it; There are no rules or laws. These steelhead aren't like a human, they can't decide to the minute, hour, day or week when they'll be on their bed spawning, if there even make it there. Whatever variable you can throw into the mix, do it, there's bound to be a bunch of fish affected by it. You cannot say the steelhead will lay their eggs this month, it doesn't work like that. Instead, I suggest focusing your efforts into learning, and observing, the water temps. Steelhead thrive in water temps between 40 and 58 degrees, with the lower portion of that range slowing their metabolism, in turn, depending on the waterbody, forcing you to change up presentations. Steelhead absolutely spawn in the fall, the spring run is just much better as we're getting spring runoff from all the melting snow which allows for easier runs to their respective spawning grounds.

 

Please consider catch and release fishing whenever possible to help sustain our amazing fisheries.


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