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Salmon and Trout Identification


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#1 efka

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 01:35 PM

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#2 FishingNoob

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:17 PM

Wow! Thanks for posting this! I know have some answers!
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#3 BASS BUSTER !

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:28 AM

GREAT CHART Efka!!

Thanks for Posting that. I was looking for something like that to add to my "Fish Species" file.

Regards: Rick
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#4 Rain-bow

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 12:08 PM

official CRAA Atlantic Salmon ID poster

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#5 carp-lips

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 09:23 PM

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Cool Chart...
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#6 kabes

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 07:35 PM

Last year there was a 50-50 split if this was a Steelhead or a Coho. Looking at the chart the tail has spots all over it leading me to believe its chrome.
Agree or disagree?


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#7 Rileysowner

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 08:23 PM

I think it is a Chinook based on the anal fin which looks more like that of the salmon. I am no expert on that in any way though.
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#8 Rain-bow

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 04:39 PM

That's definitely a chinook. Coho only have spots on the top part of their tail.
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#9 kabes

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 07:37 PM

yep after some more research I totally agree
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#10 NiagaraSteel

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

Last year there was a 50-50 split if this was a Steelhead or a Coho. Looking at the chart the tail has spots all over it leading me to believe its chrome.
Agree or disagree?


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I think that a chinook.
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#11 NiagaraSteel

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:19 AM

The stream stage chinook on efkas' chart looks really like they do in the streams.
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#12 BASS BUSTER !

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 06:37 PM

I put this in the other Forum, "Atlantic Salmon Identification"  Thought it wouldn't hurt to put it in here also. It's all the "Scientific Data" on the "Atlantic Salmon"

 

 

"Someone" in another Post referred to their "Scientific" Name as "Leapers" because they could Jump very high. Be assured that was NOT correct. Unless it was intended as a Joke.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A1 Name and Code.jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A2 Ecological Value.jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A3 Habitat and Feeding(2).jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A3 Reproduction(3).jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A3 Size and Age(4).jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A4 Ontario Distribution.jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A5.jpg
  • 1 A1t Atlantic Salmon A6.jpg

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#13 FrequentFlyer

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 08:20 PM

I put this in the other Forum, "Atlantic Salmon Identification"  Thought it wouldn't hurt to put it in here also. It's all the "Scientific Data" on the "Atlantic Salmon"

 

 

"Someone" in another Post referred to their "Scientific" Name as "Leapers" because they could Jump very high. Be assured that was NOT correct. Unless it was intended as a Joke.

 

 

The name, Salmo salar, is from the Latin salmo, meaning salmon, and salar, meaning leaper, according to M. Barton,[5] but more likely meaning "resident of salt water". Lewis and Short's Latin Dictionary (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1879) translates salar as a kind of trout from its use in the Idylls of the poet Ausonius (4th century CE).

 

the leaper name, could also be a name from long ago as a name that the natives gave the fish due to its ability to fly 


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#14 BASS BUSTER !

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 04:07 PM

The name, Salmo salar, is from the Latin salmo, meaning salmon, and salar, meaning leaper, according to M. Barton,[5] but more likely meaning "resident of salt water". Lewis and Short's Latin Dictionary (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1879) translates salar as a kind of trout from its use in the Idylls of the poet Ausonius (4th century CE).

 

the leaper name, could also be a name from long ago as a name that the natives gave the fish due to its ability to fly 

 

Thanks.


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#15 Just Reel With It

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 02:48 PM

I have a picture of what is either a speckled trout or....possibly a baby Atlantic salmon...I can't figure it out. Anybody know?

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#16 salmotrutta

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:49 PM

I have a picture of what is either a speckled trout or....possibly a baby Atlantic salmon...I can't figure it out. Anybody know?

100% Salmo Trutta (brown trout)

 

Fyi Speckled trout = Brook trout (which aren't really trout), and browns are speckled but aren't called that (confused yet?)


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#17 MuskieBait

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:50 PM

I have a picture of what is either a speckled trout or....possibly a baby Atlantic salmon...I can't figure it out. Anybody know?

It's a juvenile Brown Trout. The maxillary extends beyond the eye (ie, the corner of the mouth).

In Atlantic Salmon, the maxillary does not extend beyond the eye.

Atlantic Salmon has a narrower caudal peduncle when compared to Brown Trout.

The tail of Atlantic Salmon is more forked than Brown Trout, although the tail of juvenile Brown Trout are slightly forked. When mature, the tail of Brown Trout has a distinct straight edge (not forked at all).


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#18 Just Reel With It

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 08:33 AM

Thank you everyone for your answers. Hopefully I can catch myself another one. 😊
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#19 MikeFromCanmore

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 10:56 PM

I'm relatively new to salmon and trout fishing (or at least actually catching them), so hoping someone can help me out here, because even after looking at all of the charts and scrolling through Google Images, I'm still not 100% sure. About 75% though that this is a Coho... but maybe its a small chinook?

 

9

 

AmIright? Pardon the crappy picture. I realize that without seeing the tail it makes it kind of tough.


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#20 Huronfly

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 10:29 AM

That's a ho


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