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Float setup/gear help

float setup steelhead salmon river

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#1 rayray519

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 02:05 PM

This will be my 3rd year river float fishing.  I am using the following setup:

 

Rod:

Shimano CSS-130ML4B (13ft) Power: Med/Light, Action: Moderate

http://www.cabelas.c...anagerId=116688

 

Reel:

Raven Matrix

 

So far I have been using the wooden raven floats for all my steelhead fishing, fixing the floats to the line.  I have wanted to learn how to use the plastic drennan type floats with bobber stops.  

 

Are there any good videos or pictures that illustrate how to setup for Ontario tribs river fishing?  I really want a setup where I don't need to worry about the float, (auto adjusting to water depths).  I struggle to know that my bait/presentation is making down to the properly depths.  How can I tell that I have things setup properly and presenting the offerings to the fish correctly?

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Thank you!

 


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#2 Slickrick

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 02:42 PM

easy.  one bobber stop above the float, and one below.  you can slide them to fix the float or leave some space if you want it to slide up/down the line. 


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#3 Pwnisher

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 02:57 PM

Same problem for me. I think the more experienced fishermen are able to feel their splitshots bouncing along the bottom but I just haven't been able to tell when the bait is close to the bottom. As for using the drennan type floats, the term you are looking for is a slip bobber rig. Here is a video that I use to set up my slip bobber rigs:

 


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#4 RiverRuns

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 03:45 PM

The slip-float won't auto- adjust for you. You still need to move the stop to regulate depth. The key, I find, is to get the split shot right...the goal is to have your bait moving along the bottom ahead of the rest of your terminal tackle. This does take some trial and error; there is no set fix. Rivers move differently, and you have to adjust float depth/ shot according to conditions.
From top to bottom I usually start out as follows:
1) Float stop>>plastic bead>>float>>plastic bead>>swivel (this gear is all on the main line ...usually 10 lb.)
2) Split shots arranged in groups of 2 or 3 on a 4 ft. ( approx.)"shot line". Use bigger shot near the float, and decrease the size as you move down the line. Total grams of shot should be very close to amt. specified on float. Shot line should be rated lighter than main line , but not as light as your leader. Put a second swivel at the end of this line.
3) Approx. 2 ft. Flourocarbon leader (4-5 lb.) with hook/fly etc. on the end.
You may have to use different size floats, and shorten/lengthen shot line depending on the water you are fishing. You fine tune on the water by moving float stop up and down, and sliding shots up or down. Sometimes, in fast, deep water, I'll put several bigger shots on the main line to cock the float.
The goal, as stated, is to have your bait ticking along close to bottom, and having your float weighted so it will drop at the slightest take from a fish. You should probably hook bottom occasionally so you know you are deep enough. Most successful float fishermen I've observed hold back on their reel a bit ( pinky drag) to ensure the bait is always the first thing the fish see. The float should cock back a bit as it travels downstream.
Experience, as always, is the best teacher. Start with a float that you think best matches conditions ( 4 g for clear, shallow conditions, 6-7g for mid- size rivers, and 10+ g for fast and deep... Niagara sometimes requires a 20g), set up a shot line which compliments the float, tie on your bait go out and fish!
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#5 NaturehasIT

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 10:21 PM

This will be my 3rd year river float fishing.  I am using the following setup:

 

Rod:

Shimano CSS-130ML4B (13ft) Power: Med/Light, Action: Moderate

http://www.cabelas.c...anagerId=116688

 

Reel:

Raven Matrix

 

So far I have been using the wooden raven floats for all my steelhead fishing, fixing the floats to the line.  I have wanted to learn how to use the plastic drennan type floats with bobber stops.  

 

Are there any good videos or pictures that illustrate how to setup for Ontario tribs river fishing?  I really want a setup where I don't need to worry about the float, (auto adjusting to water depths).  I struggle to know that my bait/presentation is making down to the properly depths.  How can I tell that I have things setup properly and presenting the offerings to the fish correctly?

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Thank you!

Where u goin fishing tomorrow?? Pm me if u going out East we can meet up and i can help u out with that setup.


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#6 rayray519

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 08:43 AM

The slip-float won't auto- adjust for you. You still need to move the stop to regulate depth. The key, I find, is to get the split shot right...the goal is to have your bait moving along the bottom ahead of the rest of your terminal tackle. This does take some trial and error; there is no set fix. Rivers move differently, and you have to adjust float depth/ shot according to conditions.
From top to bottom I usually start out as follows:
1) Float stop>>plastic bead>>float>>plastic bead>>swivel (this gear is all on the main line ...usually 10 lb.)
2) Split shots arranged in groups of 2 or 3 on a 4 ft. ( approx.)"shot line". Use bigger shot near the float, and decrease the size as you move down the line. Total grams of shot should be very close to amt. specified on float. Shot line should be rated lighter than main line , but not as light as your leader. Put a second swivel at the end of this line.
3) Approx. 2 ft. Flourocarbon leader (4-5 lb.) with hook/fly etc. on the end.
You may have to use different size floats, and shorten/lengthen shot line depending on the water you are fishing. You fine tune on the water by moving float stop up and down, and sliding shots up or down. Sometimes, in fast, deep water, I'll put several bigger shots on the main line to cock the float.
The goal, as stated, is to have your bait ticking along close to bottom, and having your float weighted so it will drop at the slightest take from a fish. You should probably hook bottom occasionally so you know you are deep enough. Most successful float fishermen I've observed hold back on their reel a bit ( pinky drag) to ensure the bait is always the first thing the fish see. The float should cock back a bit as it travels downstream.
Experience, as always, is the best teacher. Start with a float that you think best matches conditions ( 4 g for clear, shallow conditions, 6-7g for mid- size rivers, and 10+ g for fast and deep... Niagara sometimes requires a 20g), set up a shot line which compliments the float, tie on your bait go out and fish!


Thanks very much this is very helpful. I'm going to play around with a few different methods and try the 2 swivel approach as well.
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#7 rayray519

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 08:45 AM

Same problem for me. I think the more experienced fishermen are able to feel their splitshots bouncing along the bottom but I just haven't been able to tell when the bait is close to the bottom. As for using the drennan type floats, the term you are looking for is a slip bobber rig. Here is a video that I use to set up my slip bobber rigs:


Great thanks for this video. Its helpful.
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#8 DILLIGAF?!

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 08:57 AM

Just my 2 cents...I used to set up my gear with a backing +_fancy main line (hi vis float line etc etc) + fluoro leader (for the fish to not see the line but just the bait).

 

Now my set up is cheap (12lb. big game trilene mono) main + float would be right at the swivel putting about 3 shots between the float and the swivel. then I run the leader 4' - 7' depending on depth of water. but my leader is also mono. I use suffix 4lb(for steelhead) 6lb-8lb (salmon).

 

If you're just starting with pin, i would suggest those fancy stuff. but if you get used to it you can later on use cheap stuff.


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#9 rayray519

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 09:08 AM

Just my 2 cents...I used to set up my gear with a backing +_fancy main line (hi vis float line etc etc) + fluoro leader (for the fish to not see the line but just the bait).

Now my set up is cheap (12lb. big game trilene mono) main + float would be right at the swivel putting about 3 shots between the float and the swivel. then I run the leader 4' - 7' depending on depth of water. but my leader is also mono. I use suffix 4lb(for steelhead) 6lb-8lb (salmon).

If you're just starting with pin, i would suggest those fancy stuff. but if you get used to it you can later on use cheap stuff.


Thanks Dilligaf. This is also helpful advice.
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#10 Shawarma

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 09:39 AM

I was told a tip on how to figure out bottom and RiverRuns mentioned it as well. 

 

Look at which way the tip of your float is pointing. If it's pointing downstream, then your bait, split shots are dragging on the bottom. If it's pointing upstream, then you're good to go. 

 

So, to figure out how deep it should be, find bottom first, then go 6 inches up. You'll need to adjust the depths anyway to figure out where the fish are and what they want, but that rule is the general one. 

 

I use the small silicone tubes on my line so i can easily swap out bobbers and move it up or down as well. Quick, effortless. 


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