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Trout id help

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#1 bharkasaig

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 06:19 PM

I caught this today. Can't quite tell what it is and would love to learn.

 

It's been a rough 2017 for me. Have been out targeting trout and have been absolutely skunked. Even fishing for whatever with my son has given us nothing. Good thing we both just love getting out.

 

So I decided to hit a western trib we had a ton of fun on last year, mostly chub but the occasional trout parr - exciting for 4 year olds (and me).

 

I got it on a size 0 mepps silver.

 

Thanks

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#2 salmotrutta

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 07:22 PM

That's a rainbow. 


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#3 bharkasaig

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 08:19 PM

Thanks!

 

So, how can you tell? As I said, I'd love to learn to distinguish between species. 


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#4 salmotrutta

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 10:11 PM

 edit


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#5 salmotrutta

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 10:18 PM

Thanks!

 

So, how can you tell? As I said, I'd love to learn to distinguish between species. 

 

Shape (head size relative to body etc.), colouration, spots (location, colour of spots, degree of spotting).

 

 

 

Which species of trout / salmon did you have it narrowed down to?

 

 

 

Look up brown trout (which can look similar to atlantic salmon) to learn how they look. 

 

Brook trout are fairly distinct as far as streams go (in lakes, can be confusion between lakers, splake, brookies).

 

Coho and chinook salmon, which are plentiful in Ontario, are usually back in the lake before they reach a size that anglers will catch in the streams, or so I've heard.

 

Not sure what a pink salmon parr looks like but they might also be back in the lake before reaching a substantial size. 

 

Fish identification comes with practice and time. And you can have vastly different colouration and shape within a species depending on each fish, time of year, whether it's a resident or migratory fish, etc. A silver trout or salmon in the lake or ocean will look totally different in full on spawning colours, body shape can also completely change. 


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#6 bharkasaig

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 08:11 PM

Thanks!


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#7 FrequentFlyer

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 11:56 PM

those are a rainbows parr markings, they will soon disappear, i caught a 50/50 parr 2 years ago

 

IMAG0070_1_zpsg4zvaxaa.jpg


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#8 Legend Boats

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 11:31 PM

Shape (head size relative to body etc.), colouration, spots (location, colour of spots, degree of spotting).

 

 

 

Which species of trout / salmon did you have it narrowed down to?

 

 

 

Look up brown trout (which can look similar to atlantic salmon) to learn how they look. 

 

Brook trout are fairly distinct as far as streams go (in lakes, can be confusion between lakers, splake, brookies).

 

Coho and chinook salmon, which are plentiful in Ontario, are usually back in the lake before they reach a size that anglers will catch in the streams, or so I've heard.

 

Not sure what a pink salmon parr looks like but they might also be back in the lake before reaching a substantial size. 

 

Fish identification comes with practice and time. And you can have vastly different colouration and shape within a species depending on each fish, time of year, whether it's a resident or migratory fish, etc. A silver trout or salmon in the lake or ocean will look totally different in full on spawning colours, body shape can also completely change. 

It's a small rainbow trout! Or steelhead.


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