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#1 OntarioFishingHQ

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 11:21 AM

The recent explosion of the Kayak fishing scene has got me really thinking about buying one.  

 

What are the opinions of the folks here on Kayak fishing?  

If you do fish from a Kayak now - what type? Would you recommend it?

 

It is a somewhat expensive investment so I would like to see opinions. My main fear is that I will buy one and never use it.

 

Any input would be awesome!

 

Thanks  :mrgreen:


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#2 NADO

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 09:56 AM

The recent explosion of the Kayak fishing scene has got me really thinking about buying one.  

 

What are the opinions of the folks here on Kayak fishing?  

If you do fish from a Kayak now - what type? Would you recommend it?

 

It is a somewhat expensive investment so I would like to see opinions. My main fear is that I will buy one and never use it.

 

Any input would be awesome!

 

Thanks  :mrgreen:

 

You definitely want a sit on top style kayak, the sit on top is more comfortable for fishing and it also allows water that you take on to drain away so you can fish in rough conditions without worrying about sinking. Then you just need to make sure you get a kayak that has good stability and decide if you want manual power or some sort of drive system. If you are trolling deep water I would highly recommend some sort of drive system as it is very difficult to troll deep water rigs without one. The drive system can either be a built in manual system or an electric trolling motor, both have their benefits.


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#3 TheTallOutdoorsman

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:13 AM

NADO is definitely more experienced in kayak fishing then most (Go see his videos!) so his opinion is highly valued.

 

Length is very important but also dependent on where you plan on fishing. I wouldn't go out on lake Ontario in less than a 11' kayak but a lot of the smaller bodies of water that you may want to explore, a 9' would be more than capable.

 

Be mindful of the weight capacity too! Many people make the mistake of taking their gear into account when going fishing and may overweight their kayaks! (High risk of sinking!)

 

Prices vary on kayaks from a few hundred to a few thousand of dollars, depends on budgets!

 

In my opinion, the "best" value/investment kayaks are made by Hobie (I wish I owned one), They are sit on top with higher walls which gives you greater stability, so much so that you can stand in many of them (similar to a paddle board). Options are also endless, from petals to electronic motors to forward and reverse gears and steering so get something better out of the gate and you will be thankful for it!

 

Hope that helps!


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#4 TheTallOutdoorsman

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:18 AM

https://www.hobie.co...-pro-angler-12/

(Example of an "Ideal" fishing kayak)


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#5 Huronfly

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:30 AM

Depending where you are using it, get one that you can stand on as well. I find that quite important while using a fly rod on inland lakes anyway. I also wish I had some other drive system like foot pedals, it would make cruising through waves at a consistant speed much easier...


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#6 BigT555

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:32 AM

You definitely want a sit on top style kayak, the sit on top is more comfortable for fishing and it also allows water that you take on to drain away so you can fish in rough conditions without worrying about sinking. Then you just need to make sure you get a kayak that has good stability and decide if you want manual power or some sort of drive system. If you are trolling deep water I would highly recommend some sort of drive system as it is very difficult to troll deep water rigs without one. The drive system can either be a built in manual system or an electric trolling motor, both have their benefits.

I hear that sit on is better quite often.  Now I have never fished off of one, but i have a 10ft sit in kayak and if you manage your gear correctly it is more than fine, and quite a bit cheaper.  Costco has kayaks every spring for $325 (400 reg. with a 75 off coupon that comes around early april) that come with the yak, a paddle, a spray skirt (which i have never used, actually sold it on kijiji for $25) and a roof carry kit.  All you need is to spend a bit of money for rod holders and it will get you into the sport.  Between the yak and the holders and whatnot, I spent about $500 but I put in 2 flush mount holders, one cannon rod holder, 2 cleats, bought a small anchor and made a diy trolley for it.  The kayak there (pelican quest 100 if you want to google it) is really stable, tracks well and has a couple dry hatches

 

I've fished the thames, the grand, maitland, the french and the bayfeild rivers and small lakes, went on st clair on calm days, and backcountry camped out of it almost a dozen times.  Best investment I have ever made, hands down.


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#7 NADO

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 11:16 AM

I hear that sit on is better quite often.  Now I have never fished off of one, but i have a 10ft sit in kayak and if you manage your gear correctly it is more than fine, and quite a bit cheaper.  Costco has kayaks every spring for $325 (400 reg. with a 75 off coupon that comes around early april) that come with the yak, a paddle, a spray skirt (which i have never used, actually sold it on kijiji for $25) and a roof carry kit.  All you need is to spend a bit of money for rod holders and it will get you into the sport.  Between the yak and the holders and whatnot, I spent about $500 but I put in 2 flush mount holders, one cannon rod holder, 2 cleats, bought a small anchor and made a diy trolley for it.  The kayak there (pelican quest 100 if you want to google it) is really stable, tracks well and has a couple dry hatches

 

I've fished the thames, the grand, maitland, the french and the bayfeild rivers and small lakes, went on st clair on calm days, and backcountry camped out of it almost a dozen times.  Best investment I have ever made, hands down.

 

You can definitely get away with the kayak you mentioned on rivers and small lakes, its also worth mentioning that the small sit in kayaks are much much lighter so they are easier to transport. However if you want to take the kayak out on big water I personally wouldn't consider the costco kayak, its more of a fun kayak for messing around and keeping at a cottage. For $500 you can find a decent used sit on top kayak on kijiji if you are patient, I picked up my first Ocean Kayak Sidekick for $350 or $400.


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#8 outdoorguy

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 12:05 PM

I would keep in mind storage capacity and stability when buying a fishing kayak.  Also, definitely go with a SOT.  Way better when it comes to fishing.  Here's a good guide if you want to see some pros and cons of different models.


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#9 Chrome Bullets

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 01:57 AM

Your target species will be a determining factor here. This may also determine your propulsion method as well. Paddle vs Peddle is always a hot topic. If you are fishing back water ponds and rivers then a nice light and cheap yak/combo is where it will be at. These will be your paddle yak and variants. If you are out deep water trolling on Lake Ontario in that same yak, your arms will succumb to exhaustion over time. Pulling around dipsy diver, Torpedo divers, or a cannon ball of any weight will burn your arms out in no time.
 
My target species is Salmon and Steelhead. I am a deep water troller. I switched over to a Hobie PA 14 peddle drive (Now own 2) once I established that this was going to be my target species. I quickly learned that even though I was using my legs for propulsion, I was burnt out after a couple hours trying to maintain a 2-3mph troll. I now run a 24V IPilot at the front of my yak to maintain my speeds over a long period of time. My days would be a lot shorter without it. Once I had everything I needed for this it was quite costly...
 
a few hundred dollar combo off Kijiji for fishing backwater lakes and rivers would be suffice.... Deep water trolling with all your needs and accessories (Never ends lol) will run you significantly more. I'm currently at $10,000 for my yak with accessories and I am still finding things I think I need lol.
 
Hobie PA 14 trolling.
20161002_031549.jpg
kayak_wrap.jpg

 


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#10 fisherman2280

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 12:50 PM

 I'm currently at $10,000 for my yak with accessories and I am still finding things I think I need lol.

 

 

 

Dude thats when you say it's time for a nice boat. My bass boat only cost 6k, she may be used but she's still near mint. My set up can handle rougher water and I never have to paddle.

 

A yak should be cheap and for special circumstances only like a canoe, when you spend 10k I think either your rich or you've never head of motor boats?


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#11 Chrome Bullets

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 02:06 PM

Lol us yakers have this conversation alot.... i prefer the yak. No trailer, no insurance, additional fees, tickets or licenses. Storage is a minimum and this thing is out there with the charters wreckin kings. I can take this where motor boats are not allowed and it fits on my car. I wouldnt have it any other way to be honest. Us guys that do this are there for the feeling and you dont get that feeling when the boat drags the fish..... the fish drags you on a yak. Its about the rush.... ive just ensured the rush happens. I get er all on vid... check it out.

https://youtu.be/qNLGCty5LZU


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#12 fisherman2280

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 02:24 PM

I do a few back country portage trips each year and that's more than enough paddling for me. I never liked having to put the canoe on top strap it down etc. 

I did try a yak one of the group we went in with last year rented and it was better than a canoe to fish from IMO if your solo.

 

I would like to try it out one day.

 

? I wondered if you guys have to set out really early for the calm water ? And how big can the waves get before you have to call it a day. 


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#13 Chrome Bullets

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 01:02 AM

We do set out at the first shimmer of light on the big pond. It is usually flat in the morning. Sometimes light rollers. I pack it in once wind hits about 25kmh. That's usually about when the waves start to really brake and the white caps begin to show their ugly face.

 

There are 6 major scupper holes through the hull of the Hobie Pro Angler series yaks. As long as you take the wave from the front or the back, any and all water rushes in and out just as fast. I'm not going to say they are unsinkable, but they are meant for big water. I took wake from an ocean liner one day. I thought for sure that I was about to go under when I seen it coming. I pointed the bow into it, and was completely engulfed. However, just as fast the water was gone.... I was wet but floating with zero water in the hull.

 

You cannot put a price on safety. I have invested a lot not only to ensure I catch fish, but also to ensure I make it home safe to see my little girls for another day.


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#14 NADO

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 01:12 PM

Too bad the show was cancelled, Pacific Warriors did a pretty good job at showing what SOT kayaks are capable of. I feel much safer in my SOT kayak than I would in a smaller 15' aluminum boat that is much easier to sink when it takes on water. 

 

https://www.discover...ific-warriors/ 


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#15 DILLIGAF?!

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 01:41 PM

Dude thats when you say it's time for a nice boat. My bass boat only cost 6k, she may be used but she's still near mint. My set up can handle rougher water and I never have to paddle.

 

A yak should be cheap and for special circumstances only like a canoe, when you spend 10k I think either your rich or you've never head of motor boats?

It's personal preference...I will have the option to get an aluminum boat+trailer+motor for $2500. I will be opting for a Pelican Catch 120. $999. Something where I can fish standing up. Hobies are great but I can't justify buying it with how much time I fish. Kayak fishing is a good exercise as well...


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