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Does pouring your own jigs save you money in the long run?


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#1 thepassionateangler

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 04:38 PM

Hey fellas!

 

So like all of us, I spend way too much money on fishing stuff, to the point that I should add my local tackle shop to my payroll hahaha.

 

Now, the question I have is with regards to jigs, anywhere from flippin' jigs to the micro marabou jigs we tie for steelheading. 

 

I usually spend a few hundred bucks a year on jigs throughout all techniques and realized that I could pour my own jigs in bulk using some of the molds available on the market today.

 

Have any of you guys used jig molds before and if so, have they saved you quite a significant amount of money over the long run (i.e., 5 to 10 years down the line)?


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#2 Tubetrax

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 09:25 AM

I have a lifetime membership of IGFA
Upon reconsideration of my reply to helping somebody on this post
I've deleted all info for making lead weights.

I ask everybody quoting my post with info for making lead jigs/weights.
To please delete the contact information.

Refer to my tungsten thread.
https://www.ontariof...nching-weights/

Tight Lines
Dan
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#3 fishfreek

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 04:44 PM

Do you usually break off a lot or get bitten off or snagged to loose so many jigs?
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#4 TI Redux

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 08:09 PM

A melting pot is going to cost $75
The jig or sinker molds are $50.

You'll have to do your own math.
Starting with how many jigs you & your fishing buddies buy yearly.

You can purchase the molds from "Do It"
https://store.do-itmolds.com/

Then you need a source of lead.
Local tire shop is where I'd look.
Amazon
eBay

Please always melt & pour hot lead outdoors "OR" in very well ventilated area.
Lead fumes are toxic
Like a running car engine in the garage with the garage door closed !

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Dan

ANYTHING but lead Thankyou.
Thought everyone knew that ?
Lots of non toxic choices.
Think you've inhaled too many fumes skidtrax.
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#5 Ibstacle

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 08:38 PM

ANYTHING but lead Thankyou.
Thought everyone knew that ?
Lots of non toxic choices.
Think you've inhaled too many fumes skidtrax.

 

lol, well said


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#6 BRMZ

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 10:13 PM

What are the "healthy alloy" choices for DIY  jigs?


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#7 Tubetrax

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 08:46 AM

That's a load of steer manure

You can only purchase tungsten sinkers.

Everybody fishing with jigs is fishing with lead.

I don't make my own jigs
I don't use them !

Let me repeat that "I don't use them"
Don't even have one around my home somewhere

They make Do It molds for all types of soft plastics.
That's how I know about Do It jig molds

With proper rigging & knot tying you rarely loose anything.

A variety of tungsten bullet weights are all I'll ever need for
Everything from punch bait to drop shot

Tight Lines
Dan
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#8 Tubetrax

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 08:52 AM

ANYTHING but lead Thankyou.
Thought everyone knew that ?
Lots of non toxic choices.
Think you've inhaled too many fumes skidtrax.



LOL, LOL, LOL
You sound like a preschool toddler calling people names.
You'll never grow up
LOL, LOL, LOL.

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Dan
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#9 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 10:28 AM

What are the "healthy alloy" choices for DIY jigs?

Tungsten the way to go.
Like skidtrax, much denser and sinks quickly with bonus of not needing as much.
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#10 thepassionateangler

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 01:30 PM

Do you usually break off a lot or get bitten off or snagged to loose so many jigs?

I wouldn't say that I lose a lot of jigs but I do lose my fair share of jigs. Usually lose them to muskies, the line scrapping against zebra mussels and even getting the jig wedged in rocks. So yeah I do lose about $50-100 worth of jigs throughout the year. 


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#11 thepassionateangler

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 01:36 PM

I know that tungsten would be the best way to make your own jigs from an environmental standpoint but realistically speaking, who has the equipment to melt tungsten?

I am pretty sure that the melting point of tungsten is in the 3000+ degrees so that would require the use of an industrial grade melting pot and heat source.

Now, like BRMZ said, what are the healthy alternatives? If anyone knows of a good alloy to use, that doesn't require spending thousands of dollars and basically transforming my shed into a factory I'd love to consider it! 


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#12 thepassionateangler

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 01:39 PM

A melting pot is going to cost $75
The jig or sinker molds are $50.

You'll have to do your own math.
Starting with how many jigs you & your fishing buddies buy yearly.

You can purchase the molds from "Do It"
https://store.do-itmolds.com/

Then you need a source of lead.
Local tire shop is where I'd look.
Amazon
eBay

Please always melt & pour hot lead outdoors "OR" in very well ventilated area.
Lead fumes are toxic
Like a running car engine in the garage with the garage door closed !

Tight Lines
Dan

Thanks for the information brother!


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#13 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 02:11 PM

Process is called sintering.
Sintering (without liquefation )
The use of tungsten beads,balls ,or powder.
Mixed with a polymer .
No need to reach the temperature of the sun . Lol

Polymer is what liguefies and binds together.
Tungsten melts at over 6000 actually.
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#14 BRMZ

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 02:54 PM

Still the lowest temperature for tungsten sintering seems to be at 1200 C this will require kiln. Plus god knows what such temperature would do to the hooks. 

thepassionateangler Making your own tackle is rewarding by itself.  This is very easy and fairly inexpensive project. All you need is 50$ mold, 10$ worth of lead from your nearest scrap yard, tin can  and torch.  

 

Savings will be probably negligible but it is just fun.


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#15 Ibstacle

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 03:21 PM

I don't make my own jigs
I don't use them !

Let me repeat that "I don't use them"
Don't even have one around my home somewhere

 

lmao what kind of fishing are you doing??..... Bobber and worm?  :mrgreen: 

 

Majority of my bass are caught using a jig head. 


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#16 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 03:39 PM

Still the lowest temperature for tungsten sintering seems to be at 1200 C this will require kiln. Plus god knows what such temperature would do to the hooks.
thepassionateangler Making your own tackle is rewarding by itself. This is very easy and fairly inexpensive project. All you need is 50$ mold, 10$ worth of lead from your nearest scrap yard, tin can and torch.

Savings will be probably negligible but it is just fun.

Glad you learned a new word today.
Sintering
Now let's work on, lead poisoning.
10 to 15% of our premature waterfowl deaths are because of lead poisoning.
Ingestion of fish containing lead.
Go ahead and keep promoting making your own lead weights.
For pennies more.
Myself I'll buy the alternative every time.
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#17 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 03:45 PM

I wouldn't say that I lose a lot of jigs but I do lose my fair share of jigs. Usually lose them to muskies, the line scrapping against zebra mussels and even getting the jig wedged in rocks. So yeah I do lose about $50-100 worth of jigs throughout the year.

Oh Boy
If fishing pike or Muskie.
Try using a steel leader.
They've been available for quite a while me thinks.
YES
Sarcasm.
Seems to be hard to interput for a lot of you guys lately.
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#18 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 03:54 PM

Still the lowest temperature for tungsten sintering seems to be at 1200 C this will require kiln. Plus god knows what such temperature would do to the hooks.
thepassionateangler Making your own tackle is rewarding by itself. This is very easy and fairly inexpensive project. All you need is 50$ mold, 10$ worth of lead from your nearest scrap yard, tin can and torch.

Savings will be probably negligible but it is just fun.

Make a batch with your tin on your living room carpet tonight.
It's just fun !
Now I'm only holding the torch to my bare hand.
But it feels about 3600 degrees ?
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#19 fishfreek

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 04:46 PM

100 lb fluorocarbon leader can save you a lot of $ when going after toothy critters.
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#20 TI Redux

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 05:05 PM

100 lb fluorocarbon leader can save you a lot of $ when going after toothy critters.

He's fishing bass.
Assuming he's already running that.
Cheaper than buying a net !!!
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